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Distressfor Rent Act Cap 293 - as Plain Text by MWakili

LAWS OF KENYA DISTRESS FOR RENT ACT CHAPTER 293 Revised Edition 2012 [2010] Published by the National Council for Law Reporting with the Authority of the Attorney-General www.kenyalaw.org [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent CHAPTER 293 DISTRESS FOR RENT ACT ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS Section 1.

Short title.

2.

Interpretation.

3.

Right of distress.

4.

Distrained goods may be sold under certain circumstances.

5.

Rent in arrear may be distrained for after determination of lease.

6.

Crops may be detained and sold.

7.

Penalty for pound breach.

8.

Repealed.

9.

Landlord may distrain and sell goods fraudulently carried off premises.

10.

Penalty for fraud, or assisting therein.

11.

Landlord may break into house to seize goods fraudulently secured therein.

12.

Power to distrain stock or crops on premises for arrears of rent.

13.

Distress may be secured and sold on premises.

14.

Tenant holding premises after time notified to pay double rent.

15.

Distress for rent not unlawful for any irregularity.

16.

Articles exempted from distress.

17.

Licensed auctioneer to give copy of charges to person distrained.

18.

Repealed.

19.

Under-tenant or lodger may make declaration that goods distrained are his property.

20.

Penalty on superior landlord disregarding lodgers declaration.

21.

Payments by lodger to superior landlord.

22.

Exclusion of certain tenants.

23.

To avoid distress.

24.

No goods to be taken in execution unless party before removal pays landlord the rent due up to one years arrears.

25.

Limitation of distress in respect of things to be distrained.

26.

Remedy for wrongful distress.

27.

Rules.

3 [Issue 1] [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent CHAPTER 293 DISTRESS FOR RENT ACT [Date of commencement: 1st June, 1938.] An Act of Parliament relating to distress for rent [Cap.

154 (1948), Act No.

28 of 1961, L.N.

2/1964, Act No.

19 of 1964, Act No.

5 of 1996, Act No.

17 of 2006.] 1.

Short title This Act may be cited as the Distress for Rent Act.

2.

Interpretation In this Act, except where the context otherwise requires agricultural holding means any land used for agricultural or pastoral purposes; approved valuer means a valuer licensed under the Valuers Act (Cap.

532) or a licensed auctioneer, but excludes an auctioneer levying distress or any person acting on his behalf; licensed auctioneer has the meaning assigned to it in section 2 of the Auctioneers Act, 1996; superior landlord includes a landlord in cases where the goods seized are not those of an under-tenant or lodger; tenant and under-tenant do not include a lodger.

[Act No.

28 of 1961, Sch., Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 3.

Right of distress (1) Subject to the provisions of this Act and any other written law, any person having any rent or rent service in arrear and due upon a grant, lease, demise or contract shall have the same remedy by distress for the recovery of that rent or rent service as is given by the common law of England in a similar case.

(2) No distress shall be levied between sunset and sunrise or on any Sunday.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 4.

Distrained goods may be sold under certain circumstances (1) Where any goods or chattels are distrained for rent reserved and due upon a grant, demise, lease or contract, and the tenant or owner of the goods or chattels so distrained does not, within fourteen days after distress has been made, and notice thereof (stating the cause of the making of the distress) left on the premises charged with the rent distrained for, pay the rent together with the costs of the distress, or replevy them, with sufficient security to be given to the licensed auctioneer according to law, the person distraining may lawfully sell on the premises or remove and sell the goods and chattels so distrained for the best price which can be obtained for them, towards satisfaction of the rent for which they are distrained, and of the charges of the distress, removal and sale, handing over the surplus (if any) to the owner.

5 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent (2) If, before the expiration of the seven days after the destraint, the tenant or owner of the goods distrained, in writing, so requests, the goods and chattels distrained shall be removed to a public auction room or to some other fit and proper place specified in the request, and be there sold by public auction by a licensed auctioneer towards satisfaction of the rent for which they are distrained, and of the charges of the distress and sale, and the surplus (if any) shall be handed over to the owner; but the costs and expenses of removal, and any damage to the goods and chattels arising therefrom, shall be paid by the person requesting the removal.

(3) If, before the expiration of the seven days after destraint, the tenant or owner of the goods and chattels distrained by writing requires that the value of the goods and chattels shall be ascertained, the person distraining shall cause them to be valued by an approved valuer and, after the valuation and the expiration of the ten days, may, unless the goods are sold by public auction as mentioned in subsection (2), lawfully sell the goods and chattels so distrained for the best price which can be obtained for them, towards satisfaction of the rent for which they are distrained, and of the charges of the distress, valuation and sale, handing over the surplus (if any) to the owner; and the costs and expenses of valuation, when required by the tenant or owner, shall be paid by him.

(4) The period of fourteen days within which the tenant or owner of goods and chattels distrained may replevy them shall be extended to a period of not more than fifteen days if the tenant or owner makes a request in writing in that behalf to the landlord or other person levying the distress, and also gives security for any additional cost that may be occasioned by the extension of time: Provided that the landlord or person levying the distress may, at the written request, or with the written consent, of the tenant or owner, sell the goods and chattels distrained or part of them, at any time before the expiration of the extended period.

[Act No.

28 of 1961, Sch., Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 5.

Rent in arrear may be distrained for after determination of lease Any person having rent in arrear and due upon a demise, lease or contract after the ending or determination of the demise, lease or contract, may distrain for the arrears after the ending or determination in the same manner as he might have done if the demise, lease or contract had not been ended or determined: Provided that distress under this section shall be made within the space of six months after the determination of the demise, lease or contract and during the continuance of the landlords title or interest, and during the possession of the tenant from whom the arrears became due.

6.

Crops may be detained and sold (1) Any person having rent in arrear and due upon a grant, demise, lease or contract may instruct a licensed auctioneer to seize and secure any crops loose and not attached to the land or lying and being in any barn or granary, or in any place or building used for the storage of crops or otherwise, upon any part of the land or ground charged with that rent, and may lock up or detain them in the place where they are found, for or in the nature of a distress, until they are [Issue 1] 6 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent replevied, and in default of their being replevied upon security to be given within fourteen days from the seizure thereof the crops be sold for the best price which can be obtained for them: Provided that crops so distrained shall not be removed by the person distraining to the damage of the owner thereof out of the place where they are found and seized, but be kept there (as impounded) until they are replevied or sold in default of replevying them within the fourteen days.

(2) The provisions of subsections (2), (3) and (4) of section 4 shall apply to crops seized and secured under this section.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 7.

Penalty for pound breach If any person in any unauthorized manner removes or causes to be removed goods, chattels, stock or crops distrained upon for rent from any place where they or any of them are lawfully stored or detained, he shall be guilty of an offence and liable to pay to the person or persons aggrieved by the removal three times the value of the goods, chattels, stock or crops so removed, in addition to any costs incurred by the person or persons so aggrieved in the prosecution of the offender, and the tenant or owner of the goods, chattels, stock or crops or any of them so removed shall be liable to the same penalties as are imposed upon the person removing or causing to be removed the goods, chattels, stock or crops, where they or any of them are afterwards found to have come into his use or possession.

8.

Repealed by Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34 9.

Landlord may distrain and sell goods fraudulently carried off premises If the tenant or lessee or person in possession or occupation of any premises in respect of which any rent is reserved, due or made payable, fraudulently or clandestinely removes or carries away, or causes or permits to be removed or carried away, from the premises any goods or chattels liable to be seized for that rent to prevent the landlord or lessor from distraining them for arrears of rent so reserved, due or made payable, the landlord or lessor or any person or persons lawfully empowered by him for that purpose, may, within the space of thirty days following the removal or carrying away of those goods or chattels instruct a licensed auctioneer to take and seize the goods and chattels, wherever they are found, as a distress for the arrears of rent; and may sell or otherwise dispose of them as if the goods and chattels had actually been distrained by a licensed auctioneer: Provided that no licensed auctioneer shall take or seize as a distress any such goods or chattels which are sold bona fide, and for a valuable consideration, before the seizure, to any person or persons not privy to the fraud, notwithstanding anything herein contained to the contrary.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 10.

Penalty for fraud, or assisting therein If a tenant or lessee referred to in section 9 fraudulently removes and conveys away his goods or chattels, or if any person wilfully and knowingly aids or assists a tenant or lessee in fraudulent conveying away or carrying off of any part of his goods or chattels, or in concealing them, the tenant, lessee or other person shall 7 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent be liable to pay to the landlord or lessor from whose estate the goods and chattels were fraudulently carried off double the value of the goods so carried off or concealed, and that liability shall be a civil debt recoverable summarily.

11.

Landlord may break into house to seize goods fraudulently secured therein Where any goods or chattels fraudulently or clandestinely conveyed or carried away by a tenant or a lessee or his servant or agent, or other person or persons aiding or assisting therein are kept in any house, barn, stable, out-house, yard, close or place locked up, fastened or otherwise secured so as to prevent the goods or chattels from being taken and seized as distress for arrears of rent, a licensed auctioneer acting on behalf of the landlord or lessor may, in the day time, break into such place and may take and seize the goods or chattels for the arrears of rent as he might have done by virtue of this Act if those goods or chattels had been put in an open field or place.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 12.

Power to distrain stock or crops on premises for arrears of rent (1) A licensed auctioneer acting on behalf of the lessor or landlord, may take and seize, as a distress for arrears of rent, any cattle or stock of any lessee or tenant feeding or depasturing upon any part of the premises demised or held, or upon any unalienated Government land; and he may also take and seize all sorts of crops of whatsoever description which are growing on any part of the premises so demised or held, as a distress for arrears of rent, and cut, gather, make, cure, carry them and lay them up, when ripe, in the barns, or other proper place on the premises so demised or held; and, where there is no barn or proper place on the premises so demised or held, then in any other barn or proper place which the lessor or landlord or a licensed auctioneer hires or otherwise procures for that purpose, and as near as may be to the premises, and thereafter he may sell the cattle and crops in the manner provided by section 4: Provided that, in the event of a valuation of the crops being made, the valuation shall be made when the crops are cut, gathered, cured and made, and not before.

(2) Notice of the place where the goods and chattels so distrained are lodged or deposited shall, within the space of seven days after the lodging or depositing thereof in that place, be given to the lessee or tenant, or left at the demised premises, and if, after any distress for arrears of rent so taken of any crops which are growing, and at any time before they are ripe and cut, cured or gathered, the tenant or lessee, his executors, administrators or assignees pay or cause to be paid to the lessor or landlord for whom the distress is taken, or to the person usually employed to receive the rents of the lessor or landlord, the whole rent which is then in arrear, together with the full costs and charges, of making the distress, and which have been occasioned thereby, then upon payment or lawful tender thereof actually made, whereby the object of the distress will be fully answered, the distress and every part thereof shall cease, and the crops so distrained shall be delivered up to the lessee or tenant, his executors, administrators or assigns, notwithstanding anything contained in this section to the contrary.

[Act No.

19 of 1964, Sch., Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] [Issue 1] 8 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent 13.

Distress may be secured and sold on premises Any person or persons lawfully taking distress for any kind or rent may impound or otherwise secure the distress so made, of whatever nature or kind it may be, in such place or on such part of the premises chargeable with the rent as is most fit and convenient for the impounding and securing thereof, and may value, sell and dispose of the distress upon the premises in the same manner and under the same directions and restraints as a person taking a distress for rent may now do off the premises under this Act; and any person or persons may come and go to and from that place or part of the premises where the distress for rent is impounded and secured in order to view, value and buy and also in order to carry off or remove the distress, on account of the purchaser thereof.

14.

Tenant holding premises after time notified to pay double rent If a tenant gives notice to his landlord of his intention to quit the premises held by him, at a time mentioned in the notice, and does not accordingly deliver up the possession thereof at the time specified in the notice, then the tenant or his executors or administrators shall from thenceforward pay to the landlord double the rent or sum which he should otherwise have paid, to be levied, sued for and recovered at the same times, and in the same manner, as the single rent or sum could be levied, sued for or recovered before the giving of the notice; and the double rent or sum shall continue to be paid while the tenant continues in possession, and the double rent may be distrained for in the same manner as is provided in this Act for distraint for rent.

15.

Distress for rent not unlawful for any irregularity Where distress is made for any kind of rent justly due, and any irregularity or unlawful act is afterwards done by the party distraining, or by his agents, the distress itself shall not be therefore deemed to be unlawful nor the party making it be deemed a trespasser ab initio, but the party aggrieved by the unlawful act or irregularity may recover full satisfaction for the special damage he has sustained thereby in a suit for that purpose: Provided that (i) when the plaintiff recovers in that suit, he shall be paid his full costs of suit and have the same remedies for them as in other cases of costs; (ii) no tenant or lessee shall recover in any suit for any such unlawful act or irregularity, if tender of amends has been made by the party distraining or his agent before the suit is brought.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 16.

Articles exempted from distress (1) The following goods and chattels shall be exempt from distress for rent (a) The property of the Government; (b) goods and chattels in the possession of the law; (c) things delivered to a person exercising a public trade, to be carried, wrought, worked up or managed in the way of his trade; (d) things in actual use or occupation of the person distrained upon at the time of the distress; 9 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent (e) things of a perishable nature, or such as cannot be restored again in the same state and condition that they were before being taken or must necessarily be damaged by removal or severance; (f) animals ferae naturae; (g) wearing apparel and bedding of the persons whose goods and chattels are being distrained upon and the tools and implements of his trade to the total value of one hundred shillings; (h) things exempted from distress under the Electric Power Act (Cap.

314); and (i) any metre (together with any fittings thereto) supplied and let on hire by a corporation or company supplying water to the premises on which the distress is levied for the purpose of ascertaining the quantity of water consumed on or supplied to those premises.

(2) A subordinate court, on complaint that goods or chattels exempt under this section from distress for rent have been taken under that distress, may by summary order direct that the goods and chattels so taken, if not sold, be restored; or, if they have been sold, that such sum as the court may determine to be the value thereof shall be paid to the complainant by the person who levied the distress or directed it to be levied.

[Act No.

19 of 1964, Sch.] 17.

Licensed auctioneer to give copy of charges to person distrained A person who makes and levies any distress shall, if requested to do so by the person or persons on whose goods and chattels distress is levied, give a copy of his charges, and of all the costs and charges of any distress, signed by him, to that person, and, in default of doing so, shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine not exceeding one hundred shillings.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 18.

Repealed by Act No.

17 of 2006, s.

21 19.

Under-tenant or lodger may make declaration that goods distrained are his property (1) If a superior landlord levies, or authorizes to be levied, a distress on any furniture, goods or chattels of (a) an under-tenant liable to pay by equal instalments not less often than every quarter of a year a rent which would return in any whole year the full annual value of the premises or of such part thereof as is comprised in the under-tenancy; or (b) a lodger; or (c) any other person not being a tenant of the premises or of any part thereof, and not having any beneficial interest in any tenancy of the premises or of any part thereof, for arrears of rent due to the superior landlord by his immediate tenant, the under-tenant, lodger or other person may serve the superior landlord, or the licensed auctioneer or other agent employed by him to levy distress, with a declaration in writing made by the under-tenant, lodger or other person, stating that the immediate tenant has no right of property or beneficial interest in the [Issue 1] 10 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent furniture, goods or chattels so distrained or threatened to be distrained upon, and that the furniture, goods or chattels are the property of or in the lawful possession of the under-tenant, lodger or other person, and are not goods or livestock to which this section is expressed not to apply; and also, in the case of an under- tenant or lodger, stating the amount of rent (if any) then due to his immediate landlord, and the times at which future instalments of rent will become due, and the amount thereof, and containing an undertaking to pay to the superior landlord any rent so due or to become due to his immediate landlord, until the arrears of rent in respect of which the distress was levied or authorized to be levied have been paid off.

(2) To the declaration there shall be annexed a correct inventory, subscribed by the under-tenant, lodger or other person, of the furniture, goods and chattels referred to in the declaration.

(3) If a tenant, lodger or other person makes or subscribes a declaration and inventory knowing either of them to be untrue in any material particular, he shall be guilty of an offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years or to a fine not exceeding two thousand shillings, or to both such imprisonment and fine.

(4) The provisions of this section shall not apply (a) to goods belonging to the husband or wife of the tenant whose rent is in arrear, nor to goods comprised in any bill of sale, chattels mortgage, hire purchase agreement or settlement made by the tenant, nor to goods in the possession, order or disposition of the tenant by the consent and permission of the true owner under such circumstances that the tenant is the reputed owner thereof; nor to any livestock to which section 25 applies; (b) (i) to goods of a partner of the immediate tenant; (ii) to goods (not being goods of a lodger) upon premises where any trade or business is carried on in which both the immediate tenant and the under-tenant have an interest; (iii) to goods (not being goods of a lodger) on premises used as offices or warehouses where the owner of the goods neglects for one calendar month after notice (which shall be given in the same manner as a notice to quit) to remove the goods and vacate the premises; (iv) to goods belonging to and in the offices of any company or corporation on premises the immediate tenant whereof is a director or officer, or in the employment, of that company or corporation: Provided that a subordinate court, upon application by the superior landlord, or any under-tenant or other person, upon hearing the parties may determine whether any goods are in fact goods covered by this subsection.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 20.

Penalty on superior landlord disregarding lodgers declaration If a superior landlord, or a licensed auctioneer or other agent employed by him, after being served with the declaration and inventory referred to in section 19, and in the case of an under-tenant or lodger after an undertaking has been 11 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent given, and the amount of rent (if any) then due has been paid or tendered in accordance with that undertaking, levies or proceeds with a distress on the furniture, goods or chattels of the under-tenant, lodger or other person, the superior landlord, licensed auctioneer or other agent shall be deemed guilty of an illegal distress, and the under-tenant, lodger or other person may apply to a subordinate court of the first or second class for an order for the restoration to him of those goods, and the court shall inquire into the truth of the declaration and inventory, and shall make such order for the recovery of the goods or otherwise as to it may seem just, and the superior landlord shall also be liable to an action at law at the suit of the under-tenant, lodger or other person, in which action the truth of the declaration and inventory may likewise be inquired into.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 21.

Payments by lodger to superior landlord For the purposes of the recovery of any sums payable by an under-tenant or lodger to a superior landlord under an undertaking referred to in section 19, or under notice served in accordance with section 23, the under-tenant or lodger shall be deemed to be the immediate tenant of the superior landlord, and the sums payable shall be deemed to be rent; but, where the under-tenant or lodger has, in pursuance of any such undertaking or notice, paid any sums to the superior landlord, he may deduct the amount thereof from any rent due or which may become due from him to his immediate landlord, and any person (other than the tenant for whose rent the distress is levied or authorized to be levied) from whose rent a deduction has been made in respect of such a payment may make the same deductions from any rent due or which may become due from him to his immediate landlord.

22.

Exclusion of certain tenants The provisions of sections 19, 20 and 21 shall not apply to an under-tenant where the under-tenancy has been created in breach of any covenant or agreement in writing between the landlord and his immediate tenant or where the under-tenancy has been created under a lease existing at the date of the passing of this Act contrary to the wish of the landlord in that behalf, expressed in writing and delivered at the premises within a reasonable time after the circumstances had come, or with due diligence would have come, to his knowledge.

23.

To avoid distress In cases where the rent of the immediate tenant of the superior landlord is in arrear, the superior landlord may serve upon any under-tenant or lodger a notice (by registered post addressed to the under-tenant or lodger upon the premises) stating the amount of the arrears of rent, and requiring all future payments of rent, whether already accrued due or not, by the under-tenant or lodger to be made direct to the superior landlord until the arrears shall have been duly paid, and the notice shall operate to transfer to the superior landlord the right to recover, receive and give a discharge for the rent.

24.

No goods to be taken in execution unless party before removal pays landlord the rent due up to one years arrears No goods or chattels lying or being in or upon any land which is leased for life or lives, term of years, at will or otherwise shall be liable to be taken by virtue of [Issue 1] 12 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent any execution or any pretence whatsoever, unless the party at whose suit the execution is levied, before the removal of those goods from the premises, pays to the landlord of the premises or his licensed auctioneer (provided that a request for payment is made by the landlord or his licensed auctioneer before the removal of the goods) such sum or sums of money as are due for rent for the premises at the time of the taking the goods or chattels: Provided that the arrears of rent shall not amount to more than one years rent, and, where they exceed one years rent, then the party at whose suit execution is levied, after paying the landlord or his licensed auctioneer one years rent, may proceed to execute his judgment as he might have done before the passing of this Act, and the licensed auctioneer or other officer shall levy and pay to the plaintiff as well the money so paid for rent as the execution money.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 25.

Limitation of distress in respect of things to be distrained (1) Where livestock belonging to another person has been taken in by the tenant of an agricultural holding to be fed at a fair price, the stock shall not be distrained for rent where there is other sufficient distress to be found, and, if so distrained by reason of other sufficient distress not being found, there shall not be recovered by that distress a sum exceeding the amount of the price agreed to be paid for the feeding, or any part thereof which remains unpaid.

(2) The owner of the stock may, at any time before it is sold, redeem the stock by paying to the distrainer a sum equal to the amount referred to in subsection (1), and any payment so made to the distrainer shall be in full discharge as against the tenant of any sum of the same amount which would be otherwise due from the owner of the stock to the tenant in respect of the price of feeding.

(3) Any portion of the stock, so long as it remains on the agricultural holding, shall continue liable to be distrained for the amount for which the whole of the stock is distrainable.

(4) Agricultural or other machinery which is the property of a person other than the tenant, and is on the agricultural holding under an agreement with the tenant for the hire or use thereof in the conduct of his business, and livestock which is the property of a person other than the tenant and is on the agricultural holding solely for breeding purposes, shall not be distrained for rent.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 26.

Remedy for wrongful distress (1) Where any dispute arises (a) in respect of any distress having been levied on an agricultural holding contrary to the provisions of this Act; or (b) as to the ownership of any livestock distrained or as to the price to be paid for the feeding of that stock; or (c) as to any other matter or thing relating to a distress on an agricultural holding, the dispute may be heard and determined by a subordinate court, and that court may make an order for restoration of any livestock or things unlawfully distrained, or may declare the price agreed to be paid for feeding, or may make any other order which justice requires.

13 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent (2) Any person aggrieved by any decision of a subordinate court under this section may appeal to the High Court.

27.

Rules The Chief Justice may make rules (a) for regulating the security (if any) to be required from licensed auctioneers; (b) for regulating the fees, charges and expenses in and incidental to distresses; (c) for establishing pounds and pound-masters for the purposes of this Act and for regulating the fees, charges and expenses in connection therewith; (d) for carrying into effect the objects of this Act.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] [Issue 1] 14 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent [Subsidiary] CHAPTER 293 DISTRESS FOR RENT ACT SUBSIDIARY LEGISLATION List of Subsidiary Legislation Page 1.

Distress for Rent Rules, 1959.

17 15 [Issue 1] [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent [Subsidiary] DISTRESS FOR RENT RULES, 1959 [Cap.

154 (1948), Sub.

Leg., L.N.

14/1959, Act No.

5 of 1996, Act No.

17 of 2006.] RULES UNDER SECTION 27 1.

These Rules may be cited as the Distress for Rent Rules, 1959.

2.

In these Rules certificate means a certificate to act as a licensed auctioneer granted or renewed under the Act; judge means the judge of the High Court; registrar means the Registrar of the High Court and includes a deputy registrar and a district registrar.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] Certificates 3.

(1) Certificates may be either general or special.

(2) A special certificate shall specify the particular distress or distresses to which it applies.

(3) Certificates shall be in Forms 1 and 2 in the First Schedule, with such variations as circumstances may require; and the date at which a general certificate will become terminable shall be added at the foot thereof.

4.

A special certificate may be granted by a judge or registrar, but a general certificate shall only be granted by a judge.

5.

A general certificate shall authorise the licensed auctioneer named in it to levy at any place in Kenya.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 6.

An advocate shall, on application, and on payment of the prescribed fee, be entitled to a general or special certificate.

7.

Subject to rule 6, a general or special certificate may, on payment of the prescribed fee, be granted to any applicant who satisfies the authority granting it that he is a fit and proper person to hold a certificate.

8.

An applicant for a general certificate shall satisfy the judge that he is resident or has his principal place of business in Kenya, and shall state whether he has ever been refused a certificate, or had a former certificate cancelled or declared void.

Security 9.

An applicant for a certificate may, if the authority applied to thinks fit, be required to give security for the due performance of his duties.

10.

The security shall be a security to the satisfaction of the Registrars in the case of a general certificate the amount shall be four hundred shillings and in the case of a special certificate the amount shall be one hundred shillings.

11.

The security shall be given to the registrar; and may be given by deposit, or by bond, or by guarantee, as the registrar may think fit.

17 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent [Subsidiary] Duration and Renewal of Certificates 12.

A general certificate shall (unless previously cancelled or declared void) have effect until the 31st December next after the granting thereof, and may be from time to time renewed by a judge for a further period of twelve months.

13.

On an application for the renewal of a certificate, the registrar shall be satisfied that the security (if any) required under these Rules is subsisting.

14.

A renewed certificate shall be in Form 3 in the First Schedule, and the date at which the renewed certificate will become terminable shall be added at the foot thereof.

Cancellation of Certificates 15.

On any application to cancel or declare void a certificate, the judge may, whether he cancels the certificate or not, order that the security shall be forfeited either wholly or in part and that the amount directed to be forfeited shall be paid to the party aggrieved.

16.

Where the judge orders that the security shall be forfeited, either wholly or in part, but does not cancel or declare void the certificate, he shall direct that the licensed auctioneer shall give fresh security as a condition of retaining his certificate.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 17.

Subject to rule 15, where a certificate is cancelled or declared void by the judge, the security shall also be cancelled, and the deposit (if any) returned.

18.

Where a certificate is cancelled or declared void, Form 4 in the First Schedule shall be used.

19.

Where a certificate is cancelled or declared void or expires in consequence of non- renewal, it shall nevertheless continue to have effect for the purpose of any distress where the licensed auctioneer has entered into possession before the date on which the certificate is cancelled or declared void or expires.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] List of Certificates 20.

(1) There shall be made and signed by the Registrar of the High Court before the 31st January in every year, and exhibited in the office of the High Court, a list of the licensed auctioneers holding certificates for the time being, and if any such certificate is cancelled or declared void, or if any fresh appointment is made, the fact shall be notified by the Registrar on that list and published by him in the Gazette.

(2) As soon as possible after the 31st January in every year the Registrar of the High Court shall cause a list of all licensed auctioneers holding general certificates to be compiled and to be supplied to all district registrars and to every subordinate court of the first class, and that list shall be exhibited on the notice board of each court concerned.

(3) All cancellations from, and additions to, the list shall be notified from time to time to each such court by the Registrar of the High Court, and shall from time to time be exhibited on the notice board of each court concerned.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] Fees, Charges and Expenses 21.

No person shall be entitled to any fees, charges or expenses for levying a distress, or for doing any act or thing in relation thereto, other than those specified in the Second Schedule, unless a judge otherwise orders.

[Issue 1] 18 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent [Subsidiary] 22.

Where the rent demanded and due exceeds four hundred shillings, the fees, charges and expenses specified in Scale I shall be allowed, and where the rent demanded and due does not exceed four hundred shillings the fees, charges and expenses specified in Scale II shall be allowed.

23.

(1) In case of any difference as to fees, charges and expenses between the parties, or any of them, the fees, charges and expenses shall be taxed by the district registrar of the district in which the distress is levied.

(2) The registrar may make such order as he thinks fit as to the costs of taxation.

24.

A copy of the table of fees, charges and expenses authorized by these Rules shall be posted up by the Registrar of the High Court in a conspicuous place in the office of the court at Nairobi and by each district registrar in his office.

25.

Every licensed auctioneer levying a distress shall on the request of the tenant produce to him his certificate and a copy of the table of fees, charges and expenses authorized by these Rules.

[Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] 26.

The court fees set out in the Third Schedule shall be payable in respect of the various items set out therein.

FIRST SCHEDULE FORM 1 (r.

3) [Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] GENERAL CERTIFICATE Date.

IN THE HIGH COURT OF KENYA Pursuant to section 18 of the Distress for Rent Act and the Rules made thereunder,.

.

of.

is hereby appointed under the provisions of the said Act to act as a licensed auctioneer to levy distress for rent in Kenya.

L.S.

.

Judge This certificate will become terminable on the.

day of ., 20.

FORM 2 (r.

3) SPECIAL CERTIFICATE Date.

IN THE HIGH COURT OF KENYA Pursuant to section 18 of the Distress for Rent Act and the Rules made thereunder,.

.

of.

is hereby authorized to act as a licensed 19 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent [Subsidiary] FIRST SCHEDULEcontinued auctioneer to levy distress on the premises of.

of.

for rent alleged to be due to.

of.

L.S.

.

Judge or Registrar FORM 3 (r.

14) [Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] RENEWED GENERAL CERTIFICATE Date.

IN THE HIGH COURT OF KENYA Pursuant to section 18 of the Distress for Rent Act and the Rules made thereunder, I by this renewed certificate authorize.

of.

to act as a licensed auctioneer to levy distresses for rent in Kenya.

L.S.

.

Judge This certificate will become terminable on the.

day of ., 20.

FORM 4 (r.

18) [Act No.

5 of 1996, s.

34.] CANCELLATION OF CERTIFICATE Date.

IN THE HIGH COURT OF KENYA In pursuance of section 18 of the Distress for Rent Act, I hereby cancel and declare void the certificate granted to.

of.

to act as a licensed auctioneer to levy distresses for rent in Kenya, save and except as to any distress where the said.

has entered into possession before the date hereof [or to act as a licensed auctioneer to levy a distress on the premises of.

.

of.

for rent alleged to be due to.

of.

].

L.S.

.

Judge [Issue 1] 20 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

293 Distress for Rent [Subsidiary] SECOND SCHEDULE [Rule 21] TABLE OF FEES, CHARGES AND EXPENSES SCALE I DISTRESSES FOR RENT WHERE THE SUM DEMANDED AND DUE EXCEEDS SH.

400 1.

For levying distress, 5 percent on any sum exceeding Sh.

400 and not exceeding Sh.

1,000, 3 percent on any additional sum up to Sh.

4,000, and 2 percent for any additional sum.

2.

For man in possession, Sh.

20 per day, to provide his own board.

3.

For appraisement, where the tenant or owner of the goods and chattels by writing requires an appraisement to be made, 3 percent on the value as appraised, with a minimum fee of Sh.

10 for each approved valuer, the cost of the appraisement to be borne by the tenant or owner requiring it.

4.

For removal of the goods and chattels distrained, the reasonable costs and charges attending the removal, to be borne and paid in the first instance by the tenant or owner, and to be subject to taxation under rule 23.

5.

For advertisements, the sum actually and necessarily paid.

6.

For commission to the auctioneer on sale by auction, 10 percent on the sum realized not exceeding 100, 5 percent on the next 200, 4 percent on the next 200, and on any additional sum 3 percent up to 1,000 and 2 percent on any sum exceeding 1,000.

7.

Reasonable fees, charges and expenses where distress is withdrawn, or where no sale takes place, and for negotiations between landlord and tenant respecting the distress, subject to taxation under rule 23.

8.

A fraction of one pound to be in all cases for the purposes of calculating poundage reckoned as one pound.

SCALE II DISTRESSES FOR RENT WHERE THE SUM DEMANDED AND DUE DOES NOT EXCEED SH.

400 1.

For levying distress, where the sum demanded and due does not exceed Sh.

200, Sh.

15, where the sum demanded and due exceeds Sh.

200, Sh.

20.

2.

For man in possession, Sh.

20 per day, to provide his own board.

3.

For appraisement, where the tenant or owner of the goods and chattels by writing requires an appraisement to be made, 50 cents in the pound on the value as appraised, in addition to the amount for the stamp, with a minimum fee of Sh.

5 for each approved valuer, the costs of the appraisement to be borne by the tenant or the owner requiring it.

4.

For removal of the goods and chattels distrained, the reasonable costs and charges attending the removal, to be borne and paid in the first instance by the tenant or owner, and to be subject to taxation under rule 23.

5.

For advertisements, if any, Sh.

20.

6.

For commission on sale and delivery of goods, 10 percent on the sum reached.

21 [Issue 1] CAP.

293 [Rev.

2012] Distress for Rent [Subsidiary] 7.

Reasonable fees, charges and expenses, where distress is withdrawn or where no sale takes place, and for negotiations between landlord and tenant respecting the distress, not to exceed in any event 5 percent on the sum demanded and due for rent, and to be subject to taxation under rule 23.

8.

A fraction of one pound to be in all cases for the purpose of calculating poundage reckoned as one pound.

THIRD SCHEDULE Repealed by Act No.

17 of 2006, s.

22 [Issue 1] 22.

Frequently asked questions

What is M-Wakili?

M-Wakili (Wakili AI) is an advanced AI-driven legal aide proficient in interpreting Kenyan law.
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Helpful, Honest, and Harmless (HHH) are three components of building AI systems (like M-Wakili) that are aligned with people’s interests.
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