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Air Passenger Service Charge Act Cap 475 - as Plain Text by MWakili

LAWS OF KENYA AIR PASSENGER SERVICE CHARGE ACT CHAPTER 475 Revised Edition 2012 [1989] Published by the National Council for Law Reporting with the Authority of the Attorney-General www.kenyalaw.org [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge CHAPTER 475 AIR PASSENGER SERVICE CHARGE ACT ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS Section 1.

Short title.

2.

Interpretation.

3.

Imposition of passenger service charge.

4.

Exemptions.

4A.

Administration by the Commissioner of Customs and Excise.

5.

Collection and payment of charge.

5A.

Collection of charges from agents.

5B Recovery of levies by distress.

6.

Failure to remit charge.

6A.

Charge to be paid into the Kenya Airports Authority Fund.

7.

Repealed.

8.

Inspection of records.

9.

Obstruction.

10.

Regulations.

SCHEDULE 3 [Issue 1] [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge CHAPTER 475 AIR PASSENGER SERVICE CHARGE ACT [Date of assent: 18th November, 1970.] [Date of commencement: 20th November, 1970.] An Act of Parliament to impose a service charge on passengers departing by air from an airport within Kenya and for connected purposes [Act No.

21 of 1970, Act No.

10 of 1972, Act No.

8 of 1973, Act No.

12 of 1977, Act No.

13 of 1979, Act No.

8 of 1983, Act No.

13 of 1984, Act No.

10 of 1988, Act No.

4 of 1993, Act No.

6 of 1994, Act No.

5 of 1998, L.N.

75/1998, L.N.

161/1998, Act No.

4 of 1999, Act No.

9 of 2000, L.N.

102/2001, Act No.

4 of 2004, Act No.

8 of 2009, L.N.

28/2012.] 1.

Short title This Act may be cited as the Air Passenger Service Charge Act.

2.

Interpretation In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires airline means any undertaking whose business includes the carriage by air of passengers for hire or reward; airport means an airport gazetted by the Commissioner under section 9 of the Customs and Excise Act (Cap.

472); charge means the passenger service charge imposed under section 3; chartered air flight means a non-scheduled air flight which has been chartered by a person or a group of persons for use by the charterer or charterers between two or more places; collection agent means an officer, servant or agent of an airline; Commissioner means (a) the Commissioner-General appointed under the Kenya Revenue Authority Act (Cap.

469); or (b) with respect to powers or functions that have been delegated under section 11(4) of the Kenya Revenue Authority Act (Cap.

469) by the Commissioner-General to another Commissioner, that other Commissioner; external journey means a journey by an aircraft commencing at an airport and terminating at a destination outside Kenya, whether or not there is to be a break in such journey within Kenya; internal journey means a journey by an aircraft commencing at an airport and terminating at a destination within Kenya; Kenya Revenue Authority means the Authority by that name established under section 3 of the Kenya Revenue Authority Act (Cap.

469); passenger means any person who is about to board an aircraft which is owned, operated or managed by an airline, but does not include a member of the crew of that aircraft, or of another aircraft owned, operated or managed by the same airline, when on duty; 5 [Issue 1] CAP.

475 [Rev.

2012] Air Passenger Service Charge specified currency means any convertible currency; ticket means a ticket purchased from a collection agent, by a person who intends to undertake an external or internal journey.

[Act No.

8 of 1973, s.

2, Act No.

10 of 1988, s.

38, Act No.

4 of 1993, s.

62, Act No.

5 of 1998, s.

45, Act No.

4 of 2004, s.

71, Act No.

8 of 2009, s.

42.] 3.

Imposition of passenger service charge (1) Subject to this Act, there shall be paid by every person who purchases a ticket for an external or internal journey an air passenger service charge of (a) forty United States dollars or the equivalent in specified currency or in Kenya shillings for an external journey; and (b) five hundred shillings for an internal journey.

(2) The Minister may, by notice in the Gazette, from time to time vary the charges specified in this section.

[Act No.

10 of 1972, Act No.

10 of 1988, Act No.

8 of 1973, Act No.

6 of 1977, Act No.

13 of 1979, Act No.

6 of 1994, s.

70, Act No.

5 of 1998, s.

46, Act No.

4 of 1999, s.

68A, L.N.

102/2001, L.N.

28/2012.] 4.

Exemptions (1) There shall be exempt from liability to pay the charge (a) any child under the age of two years; (b) any passenger embarking at an airport at which he is in transit.

(2) A passenger who pays the charge on the occasion of his embarkation on an aircraft which returns to the airport of embarkation without first landing at some other place, shall be exempt from the charge on his embarking to resume his journey on the same or any other aircraft.

(3) For the purposes of subsection (1) of this section, a passenger is in transit at an airport if (a) he disembarks at such airport from one aircraft and re-embarks there on the same or another aircraft; and (b) between so disembarking and re-embarking he does not leave the airport except in circumstances where the Commissioner is satisfied are beyond his control.

(4) The Minister may, by notice in the Gazette, exempt any class of persons from liability to pay the charge.

[Act No.

10 of 1988, s.

38, Act No.

9 of 2000, s.

89.] 4A.

Administration by the Commissioner of Customs and Excise Subject to the control of the Minister, the Commissioner shall be responsible for the administration of this Act, including the appointment of collection agents and the collection and accounting for revenues arising from the charge.

[Act No.

4 of 1993, Act No.

4 of 2004, s.

72.] 5.

Collection and payment of charge (1) A collection agent shall collect the charge upon the sale to any person who intends to undertake a journey in an aircraft owned, operated or managed by, or on charter to the airline of which he is an agent.

[Issue 1] 6 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge (2) Where an airline fails to ensure that any person travelling on an aircraft owned, operated or managed by, or on charter to the airline, pays the charge to which he is liable, the airline shall be liable to pay the amount of the charge to the Commissioner.

(3) All amounts collected by way of the charge and all amounts for which an airline is liable under subsection (2), shall be remitted by the collection agent or the airline, as the case may be, to the Commissioner within twenty-five days from the end of the month in which the charge becomes payable.

(4) Notwithstanding subsection (2) any chartered air flight which does not have its office or an agent in Kenya, shall pay the charge to the officer granting customs clearance outward before such clearance is granted.

(5) Any amount which is to be remitted to the Commissioner under subsection (3) shall, if not so remitted, be a civil debt recoverable summarily by the Commissioner.

[Act No.

5 of 1998, s.

47, Act No.

10 of 1988, s.

38, Act No.

8 of 2009, s.

43.] 5A.

Collection of charges from agents (1) The Commissioner may, by written notice addressed to any person (in this section called the agent) appoint him to be the agent of another person (in this section called the principal) for the purposes of collecting charges from the principal where the Commissioner is satisfied that the agent (a) owes or is about to pay money to the principal; (b) holds money for or on account of the principal; (c) holds money on account of some other person for payment to the principal; (d) has authority from some other person to pay money to the principal.

(2) The Commissioner shall, in the notice issued under subsection (1), specify the amount of the charges to be collected by the agent, which amount shall not exceed the amount held or owing by the agent for or to the principal.

(3) The Commissioner may, by notice in writing, require any person to furnish the Commissioner, within a reasonable time not being less than thirty days from the date of service of the notice, with a return showing details of any moneys which may be held by that person for or on account of a person from whom charges are due.

(4) An agent who claims to be, or to have become, unable to comply with the notice for any reason shall, as soon as may be practicable, notify the Commissioner accordingly in writing stating the reasons for his inability, and the Commissioner may accept and cancel, amend or reject the notification as he may think fit.

(5) Notwithstanding subsection (4), an agent shall be presumed to be holding sufficient money for the payment of the charges specified in the notice unless his notification under subsection (4) is accepted or amended, and in any proceedings for the collection of those charges he shall be estopped from asserting the lack of those moneys.

(6) Where an agent fails to remit any amount of charges specified in the notice, within thirty days of the date of service of the notice on him or the date on 7 [Issue 1] CAP.

475 [Rev.

2012] Air Passenger Service Charge which any moneys came into his hands for, or become due by him to, his principal, whichever is the later, and he has not complied with subsection (4) then the provisions of this Act relating to the collection and recovery of charges shall apply as if they were charges due and payable by him from the date when such charges should have been paid to the Commissioner.

(7) An agent who has made payment of charges under this section shall for all purposes be deemed to have acted therein with the authority of his principal and of all other persons concerned, and shall be indemnified in respect of that payment against any proceedings civil or criminal and all process, judicial or extrajudicial, notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary in any written law, contract or agreement.

(8) A person who in giving a notification under subsection (4), wilfully makes any false or misleading statement, or wilfully conceals any material fact, shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine not exceeding two hundred thousand shillings or to imprisonment for a term of not more than three years or to both.

[Act No.

4 of 2004, s.

73, Act No.

10 of 1988, s.

38.] 5B.

Recovery of levies by distress (1) If any charges payable under this Act remain unpaid after the time they were required to be paid, the Commissioner may authorize distress to be levied upon the goods, chattels and effects of the person who should have paid the charges wherever those goods, chattels and effects may be found.

(2) The following provisions of the Customs and Excise Act (Cap.

472) shall apply, with necessary modifications, with respect to distress authorised under subsection (1) (a) section 225(2), (3) and (4); and (b) the Sixth Schedule.

[Act No.

4 of 2004, s.

73.] 6.

Failure to remit charge (1) A collection agent who fails to remit the charge to the Commissioner within the prescribed period shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine not exceeding one hundred thousand shillings.

(2) A person who fails to remit the charge under subsection (1) shall, not withstanding the penalty prescribed under that subsection, be liable to remit the outstanding charge together with a penalty of three percent of the outstanding charge for each month or part thereof during which the charge remains unpaid.

[Act No.

8 of 1973, s.

4, Act No.

10 of 1988, s.

38, Act No.

5 of 1998, s.

48.] 6A.

Charge to be paid into the Kenya Airports Authority Fund.

The Commissioner shall pay the charge collected by him under this Act into the Kenya Airports Authority Fund established under the Kenya Airports Authority Act, after deducting the expenses of the Kenya Revenue Authority for the collection of the charge.

[Act No.

8 of 2009, s.

44, Act No.

10 of 1988, s.

38.] [Issue 1] 8 [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge 7.

Repealed by Act No.

5 of 1998, s.

49.

8.

Inspection of records Any person authorized in writing in that behalf by the Commissioner may, on production of his authority if so required, enter upon any premises owned, occupied or for the time being used by an airline or a collection agent, and may require the collection agent to produce for his inspection all books, documents or records relating to the sale of tickets and records relating to the embarkation of passengers, and may make copies thereof or of extracts therefrom.

[Act No.

5 of 1998, s.

50.] 9.

Obstruction Any person who obstructs any other person in the exercise of the powers conferred by section 8 of this Act upon such other person shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine not exceeding ten thousand shillings or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding twelve months or to both such fine and imprisonment.

[Act No.

5 of 1998, s.

51.] 10.

Regulations The Minister may make regulations for the better carrying into effect of the provisions of this Act, and, without prejudice to the generality of such power, for the rendering of returns by airlines or collection agents.

9 [Issue 1] [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge [Subsidiary] CHAPTER 475 AIR PASSENGER SERVICE CHARGE ACT SUBSIDIARY LEGISLATION List of Subsidiary Legislation Page 1.

Exemptions, 1970.

13 2.

Air passenger service charge regulations, 1998.

15 11 [Issue 1] [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge [Subsidiary] EXEMPTIONS Visiting Heads of State and their accompanying staff on the occasion of official visits.

[Section 4(4), L.N.

237/1970.] 13 [Issue 1] [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge [Subsidiary] AIR PASSENGER SERVICE CHARGE REGULATIONS, 1998 [L.N.

75/1998, L.N 161/1998, L.N 68/2000.] 1.

These Regulations may be cited as the Air Passenger Service Charge Regulations, 1998 and shall come into operation on the 1st September, 1998.

2.

In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires the customs has the meaning assigned to it in section 2 of the Customs and Excise Act (Cap.

472); outward passenger manifest means a list of passengers aboard an aircraft taking off from an airport in Kenya; proper officer has the meaning assigned to it under the Customs and Excise Act (Cap.

472).

3.

All collection agents shall be registered by the Commissioner using their Personal Identification Numbers issued by the Commissioner of Income Tax.

4.

A collection agent or an airline shall collect the charge in accordance with section 3 of the Act from every passenger who purchases a ticket for an external or internal journey.

5.

(1) The collection agent shall, on or before the twenty fifth day of each month following the month in which the charge became payable, submit to the Commissioner a guaranteed or bankers cheque payable to the Commissioner for the total charge collected together with a return in Form APSCI set out in the Schedule.

(2) The monthly return submitted under paragraph (1) shall be supported by an outward passenger manifest.

[L.N.

161/1998, r.

2.] 6.

The rate of exchange for any specified currency in any month shall be that notified by the International Air Transport Association (IATA) in the immediately preceding month.

[L.N.

68/2000, r.

2.] continued on page 16 15 [Issue 1] [Rev.

2012] CAP.

475 Air Passenger Service Charge [Subsidiary].

.

.

.

(r.

5) Total Charge Payable for the Month above particulars are true.

passenger Local travel charge due KSh.

100 per .Date and Stamp.

.hereby declare that the External Travel Charge due at Us$ 20 Per Passenger DATE.

.

Date Name And Address.

.PIN .gers.

Charge Paying Passen SCHEDULE [L.N.

161/1998, r.

3.] Monthly Account.

, 20 gers.

Passen Charge Exempt.

.

gers Collection Agent Total Flown Passen.

.

KSH.

KENYA REVENUE AUTHORITY CUSTOMS AND EXCISE DEPARTMENT AIR PASSENGER SERVICE CHARGE Outward Manifest Total External Travel Charge in US$ Exchange Rate Kenya Shilling equivalent (external and internal).

Rotation No.

CHARGE PAID BY CHEQUE NO.

.

Date AMOUNT I/We.

Form APSC1For the Month of.

Checked and found correct Proper Officer [Issue 1] 16.

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